Now Leasing for the 2017-2018 School Year!

Jazz at Schwartz’s Point (Plus Some Greenwich Tavern Footage)

So much time had passed since I’d visited Schwartz’s Point that the last time I was there it wasn’t completely…well, legitimate, to state thing euphemistically. During its previous incarnation, I felt kind of like I was at a speak-easy, which is a rare feeling since they don’t exist anymore. (Why did they have to do away with Prohibition? I’m sure it was more fun sneaking around to have a drink.) After dropping by last night I’m happy to report that it still kind of has a speak-easy like vibe to it: note the Oriental rugs in the windows, which along with cushioning the sound help give the club an exclusive vibe. A nice intimate club in a great old Cincinnati building: check the photo on their website and (if you don’t know already) you’ll remember passing it countless times and wondering what it was.

Last night trumpeter Barry Reis, who’s giving classes at CCM, led Ed Moss’s piano trio through some standards. There was an off-the-cuff feel to the performances; pre-song discussions included what tune to play next. At one point Reis handed the sheet music for Thelonious Monk’s “Light Blue” to pianist Ed Moss and bassist Lou Lausche, and I recorded the piece through the end of the trumpet solo. You don’t get to hear enough Monk in clubs, and when you do hear it, the musicians usually stick to the more well-known compositions – so it was doubly nice to hear them perform this lesser-known gem. Schwartz’s Point has a website to fill you in on some of the goings-on there – Schwartz’e Point Website – and Barry Reis will be performing there tonight, Friday, and Saturday. Here’s Barry Reis with the Ed Moss trio performing “Light Blue:”

Also, I’m finally getting around to posting footage from the evening of duets that took place at the Greenwich Tavern in early January. On that night pianist Charlie Wilson and vibraphonist King Reeves traded sets with vocalist April Aloisio and pianist Phillip Burkhead. ¬†Fine music was made by both groups, and, as duet artists, they complemented each other extremely well. Early in the night pianist Charlie Wilson sounded as abstract as ever heard him – and by end (the song I’m posting here), he sounded more straightforwardly soulful and righteous ¬†than ever (and how about his pre-song soliloquy!):

I’ve been a fan of jazz and bosssa nova vocalist April Aloisio for a long time, but I’ve never heard her sound as good as she did that night at the Greenwich. Having an acoustic piano and perfect sound had something to do with that, and I’m happy to report that the same chemistry she shared with Phillip Burkhead that evening is evident on their CD of duets, Daydream, which you can buy on amazon. Here’s April Aloisio and Phillip Burkhead performing Duke Ellington’s “Prelude to a Kiss:”